513 Area Code Location

    code location

  • A fact the Intel Inspector XE observes at a source code location, such as a write code location. Sometimes called an observation. A focus code location is a source code location with relationships you choose to explore.

    area

  • A space allocated for a specific purpose
  • a subject of study; “it was his area of specialization”; “areas of interest include”
  • A part of an object or surface
  • a part of an animal that has a special function or is supplied by a given artery or nerve; “in the abdominal region”
  • A region or part of a town, a country, or the world
  • a particular geographical region of indefinite boundary (usually serving some special purpose or distinguished by its people or culture or geography); “it was a mountainous area”; “Bible country”

    513

  • The area code 513 serves southwest Ohio including Cincinnati and its many suburbs as well as the cities of Hamilton, Lebanon, Mason, Middletown, Norwood, Oxford, and Trenton; it is one of the original area codes established in 1947.
  • * The Revolt of Vitalian breaks out in the East Roman Empire.
  • 513 is an in-production drama film scheduled for release in 2010.

513 area code location

513 area code location – General Tool

General Tool UV513AB Digital UVAB Meter for Ultraviolet Light Measurement
General Tool UV513AB Digital UVAB Meter for Ultraviolet Light Measurement
The General UV513AB Digital UV AB Light Meter is designed to measure ultraviolet light in the range from 280 to 400 nanometers (UV AB). The illumination range of the meter allows users to conduct the most precise quantitative measurements of ultraviolet radiation for radiometry and laboratory requirements, UV-curing in off-set printing, lamp UV intensity & aging, industrial process monitoring, semiconductor fabrication, sunlight UV intensity to prevent skin damage, sterilization and environmental monitoring.

500 Fifth Avenue Building

500 Fifth Avenue Building
Midtown Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States of America

Built in 1929-31, Shreve, Lamb & Harmon’s 500 Fifth Avenue Building is a soaring 59-story Art Deco skyscraper, located at the northwest corner of 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue. The building was constructed concurrently with the Empire State Building. Because the site was so valuable and so small, measuring only 100 feet by 208 feet, the building was designed to the maximum height and floor area allowable under the 1916 zoning code. Located in two zoning districts with differing setback requirements, it is asymmetrically massed with setbacks at the 18th, 22nd, and 25th stories on Fifth Avenue and a recessed light court beginning at the eighth story and setbacks at the 23rd, 28th, and 34th stories on West 42nd Street. Sheathed in limestone, terra cotta, and buff brick, the facades are enriched with carefully scaled Art Deco motifs, which accentuate the building’s sculptural massing and emphasize its verticality.

On Fifth Avenue the limestone and black granite main entrance is treated as a pylon framed by stylized gilded palmettos and capped by an allegorical relief by sculptor Edmond Amateis “symbolizing the genius of the modern skyscraper.” Capping the setbacks and tower are a series of angled brick and terra-cotta panels decorated with chevrons that read as pleated cresting against the skyline. When it opened in March 1931, 500 Fifth Avenue was the crowning achievement of real estate developer Walter J. Salmon, who was responsible for rebuilding the north side of West 42nd Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues in the first decades of the 20th century. Shreve, Lamb & Harmon was one of the leading architectural firms in the country specializing in skyscraper design. In addition to 500 Fifth Avenue, Shreve Lamb & Harmon designed the Empire State Building (1929-31, 350 Fifth Avenue, a designated New York City Landmark). 500 Fifth Avenue continues to be used as an office building with street-level stores.

DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS

History and Development of Midtown and the 500 Fifth Avenue Site

The area surrounding Fifth Avenue between 42nd Street and the southern end of Central Park remained rural in character until the second half of the nineteenth century, when speculative residences and mansions began to be constructed on lots newly mapped by the city. By 1900, the character of the neighborhood on the blocks north of 42nd Street began to change with the construction of, or the conversion of private residences to, exclusive retail shops, restaurants, and office buildings. By 1923, so many banks and trust companies had established uptown branches near the intersection of Park Avenue and 42nd Street and on the blocks of Fifth Avenue north of 42nd Street, that Rider’s New York City guide reported the area was popularly known as “Little Wall Street.” 42nd Street, which linked this business district to Times Square, became one of the busiest thoroughfares in New York while Fifth Avenue remained the most fashionable shopping street in the city, leading Real Estate Record & Guide to declare the parcel at 500 Fifth Avenue, at the northwest corner of 42nd Street, as “the most valuable building site on Manhattan Island north of Wall Street.”

In 1903 a young and ambitious real estate entrepreneur named Walter J. Salomon (18711953), who later changed his surname to Salmon, leased the corner lot and the adjacent L-shaped lot, which fronted on Fifth Avenue and West 42nd Street. Salmon then converted the existing building, the eight-story Hotel Bristol, into a commercial and office building and renamed it the Bristol Building. This property was to form the core of Salmon’s redevelopment plan for 500 Fifth Avenue, his crowning achievement as a real estate man and the final puzzle piece in the transformation of the entire block front into an imposing wall of modern commercial structures.

New York’s Art Deco Skyscrapers

America’s involvement in World War I, followed by a recession in the early 1920s, caused a construction lull in New York City, as in other parts of the country. By the mid 1920s, the economy had bounced back, and demand for new and larger commercial buildings was booming. Fifteen new office skyscrapers were erected in New York in 1925, and 1926 saw the construction of 30 more. This building frenzy lasted through the 1929 stock market crash, as construction went forward in the early 1930s on buildings that had already been planned and financed; although largely finished by 1932, the boom left behind a “rich array of towers,” many of them executed in what is known today as the Art Deco style. Indeed, several of New York’s most spectacular skyscrapers from this period—including the Chanin Building (Sloan & Robertson, 1927-29), the Chrysler Building (William Van Alen, 1928-30), the Empire State Building (Shreve, Lamb & Harmon, 1929-31) and the General Electric Building (Cross & Cross, 1929-31), all designa

500 Fifth Avenue

500 Fifth Avenue
Midtown Manhattan, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

Built in 1929-31, Shreve, Lamb & Harmon’s 500 Fifth Avenue Building is a soaring 59-story Art Deco skyscraper, located at the northwest corner of 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue. The building was constructed concurrently with the Empire State Building. Because the site was so valuable and so small, measuring only 100 feet by 208 feet, the building was designed to the maximum height and floor area allowable under the 1916 zoning code. Located in two zoning districts with differing setback requirements, it is asymmetrically massed with setbacks at the 18th, 22nd, and 25th stories on Fifth Avenue and a recessed light court beginning at the eighth story and setbacks at the 23rd, 28th, and 34th stories on West 42nd Street. Sheathed in limestone, terra cotta, and buff brick, the facades are enriched with carefully scaled Art Deco motifs, which accentuate the building’s sculptural massing and emphasize its verticality.

On Fifth Avenue the limestone and black granite main entrance is treated as a pylon framed by stylized gilded palmettos and capped by an allegorical relief by sculptor Edmond Amateis “symbolizing the genius of the modern skyscraper.” Capping the setbacks and tower are a series of angled brick and terra-cotta panels decorated with chevrons that read as pleated cresting against the skyline. When it opened in March 1931, 500 Fifth Avenue was the crowning achievement of real estate developer Walter J. Salmon, who was responsible for rebuilding the north side of West 42nd Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues in the first decades of the 20th century. Shreve, Lamb & Harmon was one of the leading architectural firms in the country specializing in skyscraper design. In addition to 500 Fifth Avenue, Shreve Lamb & Harmon designed the Empire State Building (1929-31, 350 Fifth Avenue, a designated New York City Landmark). 500 Fifth Avenue continues to be used as an office building with street-level stores.

DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS

History and Development of Midtown and the 500 Fifth Avenue Site

The area surrounding Fifth Avenue between 42nd Street and the southern end of Central Park remained rural in character until the second half of the nineteenth century, when speculative residences and mansions began to be constructed on lots newly mapped by the city. By 1900, the character of the neighborhood on the blocks north of 42nd Street began to change with the construction of, or the conversion of private residences to, exclusive retail shops, restaurants, and office buildings. By 1923, so many banks and trust companies had established uptown branches near the intersection of Park Avenue and 42nd Street and on the blocks of Fifth Avenue north of 42nd Street, that Rider’s New York City guide reported the area was popularly known as “Little Wall Street.” 42nd Street, which linked this business district to Times Square, became one of the busiest thoroughfares in New York while Fifth Avenue remained the most fashionable shopping street in the city, leading Real Estate Record & Guide to declare the parcel at 500 Fifth Avenue, at the northwest corner of 42nd Street, as “the most valuable building site on Manhattan Island north of Wall Street.”

In 1903 a young and ambitious real estate entrepreneur named Walter J. Salomon (18711953), who later changed his surname to Salmon, leased the corner lot and the adjacent L-shaped lot, which fronted on Fifth Avenue and West 42nd Street. Salmon then converted the existing building, the eight-story Hotel Bristol, into a commercial and office building and renamed it the Bristol Building. This property was to form the core of Salmon’s redevelopment plan for 500 Fifth Avenue, his crowning achievement as a real estate man and the final puzzle piece in the transformation of the entire block front into an imposing wall of modern commercial structures.

New York’s Art Deco Skyscrapers

America’s involvement in World War I, followed by a recession in the early 1920s, caused a construction lull in New York City, as in other parts of the country. By the mid 1920s, the economy had bounced back, and demand for new and larger commercial buildings was booming. Fifteen new office skyscrapers were erected in New York in 1925, and 1926 saw the construction of 30 more. This building frenzy lasted through the 1929 stock market crash, as construction went forward in the early 1930s on buildings that had already been planned and financed; although largely finished by 1932, the boom left behind a “rich array of towers,” many of them executed in what is known today as the Art Deco style. Indeed, several of New York’s most spectacular skyscrapers from this period—including the Chanin Building (Sloan & Robertson, 1927-29), the Chrysler Building (William Van Alen, 1928-30), the Empire State Building (Shreve, Lamb & Harmon, 1929-31) and the General Electric Building (Cross & Cross, 1929-31), all design

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